Ontario dating site romanian architect

01-Oct-2014 05:40 by 6 Comments

Ontario dating site romanian architect

Blumer, page bottom (greeting cards from Sunderland). But much of the data that follows is thanks to the efforts of Ray Ranns, (who lives near Melton Mowbray in Leicestershire, U. Ray has been most busy assembling data about the family history, building upon materials assembled by his father 'Noel Blumer Ranns'. 4, 1916, the vessel, then Norwegian owned, got into difficulties off Atherfield Point, Isle of Wight, & in very bad weather ran ashore at nearby Brook (or Brooke? 8 of the crew jumped into the sea & were picked up, with one of the 8 dying of exposure in the lifeboat. Ben Jacobs, coxswain (1892-1917) of Susan Ashley, was awarded a silver medal for the rescue though I cannot tell you which particular medal. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). long perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters HVRN.

We thank them both & particularly Ray, whose data has been the major source of information in this section. Per 1 (wreck, Isle of Wight), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The captain stayed with his ship - his body was later washed ashore. The name plate of the vessel survived & is in Brighstone village museum. The webmaster has many editions of 'Lloyd's Registers' available to him (image at left) & for the years of the vessel's life thru 1885/86, the owner is recorded as being 'Ritson & Co.' soon 'F.

Now this page, indeed the whole site, focuses on Sunderland & its shipbuilders. But you should also know that the Blumer family was involved in shipbuilding in nearby Hartlepool. Denis Wederell of New Zealand ('NZ'), indicated in 2001 that Star of Peace traded from Blyth to Lisbon, Portugal & onwards to Central America & Brazil, but visited Australia in 1879.

Luke Blumer (1793/1873) (2), a prominent citizen of Hartlepool indeed, commenced a shipbuilding business entitled 'Luke Blumer & Son' (1) in Hartlepool in 1848 with his son George Blumer (1817/1867). The vessel rescued the crew of a sinking Belgian ship (name not stated) in 1878; an oil painting of scene by Henry Loos (commissioned by the Belgian government), exists; vessel then captained by William Heatley. Data essentially confirmed by Bill Heatley who adds that a voyage to Australia or NZ was 'not typical'.

While the business was mainly in the repair of ships they did keep their workforce busy with new construction when the repair business was quiet. 'Wederell' family tradition was that vessel was lost, William Heatley in command, on NZ coast in 1888/89.

And they built 10 vessels during the short lifetime of the firm. The webmaster has many editions of Lloyd's Register available to him ex 'Google' books, thru 1885/86 - see left. Stafford, later (1870 & 1880) Francis Stafford, both of Blyth). But Bill Heatley indicates that vessel, with ancestor William Heatley in command (he drowned), was in fact sunk off Queensland in 1891. It would be good to link to an image, the oil painting, perhaps! Ray Ranns advises me that a new hull numbering series was commenced when the move was made to North Dock.

Which ceased to exist at or about the time that George Blumer died in 1867. The vessel's initial owner was 'Gregory & Co.', of Blyth, intended for use, it would appear, in the Baltic & Mediterranean trades.

Now Luke Blumer (2) was the fifth son of Luke Blumer (1757/1840) (1), the son of a blacksmith from Soho, London. Initially registered, presumably in error, as 'Matfon' - an 1861/62 typo!

Luke Blumer's (1) third son was William Blumer (1789/1850) and it is William's son John Blumer (1832/1913) who commenced shipbuilding in Sunderland. From 1876/77, the vessel was registered at Shields. Dixon' became the vessel's owners, also of Shields.

A fine image of John Blumer, dating from perhaps 1890/1900, is at left below. The Mercantile Navy List of 1880 states the owner to be R. The vessel is not listed in the 1887/88 edition of Lloyd's Register, which may mean that the vessel had been lost or broken up but it could also mean that there was a change of vessel name.

The page in 'Where Ships Are Born' states that John commenced a shipbuilding business at North Sands in 1859. 2012, this splendid watch was available for purchase. 1 indicates that an image of a brig (I presume that 'bg' means brig) of the name is available in Australia. ) that his great grandfather George Miller ('Miller') was the ship's master. From 1874/75 to 1885/86 as per the Lloyd's data now made available at left, though 'Wood' would seem to have been the vessel's Master for a short time to 1885/86 when Miller took over command again.

That date may well be incorrect, however, since this fine page, dating from 1891, references him (about 30% down) as being a builder at that location nine years earlier, in 1850, when John was just 18 years old only. The chain is 9 caret & weighs 80 grams, and the watch case is 18 caret and weighs 48 grams. Lloyd's Register of 1861/62 states that the vessel was built by Pace. The builder was 'Pace', with no reference to 'Blumer'.

The business was at that location until 1864, when Mr. Thompson took over the 'Blumer' site on North Sands (from 1891 source above). ) was the GGG grandfather of Larry Wailing, Aron Mc Intyre's father in law. And we now know, thanks to Ray Ranns, that the award to Richard Cumming, foreman plater, was referenced in the 'Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette', of Oct. Should you have an interest in acquiring the watch, or wish to learn more about it. Only modest info is WWW available - of her sad end.